“Prudence is love that chooses with sagacity between that which hinders it and that which helps it.” – Augustine of Hippo Marriages are a grand affair in India. The celebrations are as ostentatious as the rituals are uncountable.

“Prudence is love that chooses with sagacity between that which hinders it and that which helps it.”Augustine of Hippo

Marriages are a grand affair in India. The celebrations are as ostentatious as the rituals are uncountable. There are kundalis to match, ceremonious dates to be found and locked down, and aunts and uncles to be impressed. However, underneath all the colourful lehengas and oily paneer preparations, there are some very real questions that go unanswered, or worse, unasked.

This film addresses a well-shrouded taboo related to marriage and togetherness, the taboo of health and fitness of the prospective bride and groom. Seems pretty straightforward, doesn’t it? Well, that’s because it is, but it certainly does not see the light of day nearly as often as it should.

In the film, after much thought and internal conflict, Shalini poses a request to her fiancé. She wishes for them both to get some basic medical tests done prior to their marriage. The film centers around the conflict within Shalini and the reason for it. Shalini’s conflict seems apparent to her fiancé as they sit down to talk, and the reason for it becomes clear from his reaction to her request.

Viewing marriage the way Shalini sees it – an entity separate from the religious and sometimes superstitious Indian beliefs – can be a paradigm-shifter for us. Marriage is more than just putting rings on each other’s fingers, and seven rounds around a fire, and merely living under the same roof for the rest of your life. It is about having somebody who is a constant in your life, despite all the variables; someone with who you shall one day make a family.

Maybe it is time we start viewing marriage from this kind of a lens too. Maybe it is time that we don’t shudder at the question of our partner’s health or ignore that question out of fear. Asking a few premarital questions is just prudence, and not irreverence.

Is it so hard to ask these real questions? Is the prejudice against them really as deep rooted and entrenched in culture as it seems?

Watch the film and find out for yourself.